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In the city of Kitojo, Uganda, over 100,000 people have never seen a doctor. Thousands of women die needlessly during childbirth. A simple drip-IV could save a child with dysentery.

Please help us build a hospital in Kitojo! There's already an HIV/AIDS clinic but it cannot accommodate clients who need skilled overnight nursing, is not licensed to deliver other services, such as childhood vaccinations, and has a limited supply of anti-retrovirals since it isn't classified as a hospital.

All donations to the Friends of Ruwenzori are tax-deductible, and they are an all volunteer group so one hundred percent of donations go to the hospital fund.

They are a 501c3 charitable foundation started in 2004 by Karen and Gil Gleason of Orinda. More information about the project, and the group's past accomplishments, available here: http://www.friendsofruwenzori.org
or by mail at Friends of Ruwenzori, 8 Altamount Drive, Orinda, CA 94109
 
 
Books for Africa is the largest of a few organizations shipping donated and recycled good-condition books/computers to various African countries. I believe Uganda is one of the places receiving supplies. Leaders from various organizations and charities endorse and have served on the board of Books for Africa - and they believe education holds great power to transform local economies worldwide. The books are free/low cost and recycled usually, but shipping still takes quite a bit of cash.

Books for Africa is online here: http://www.booksforafrica.org/index.html

One free way you can support Books for Africa is by joining the new website http://www.everywun.com - easy and free to log in and join, no spam or advertising as far as I can tell. You can earn points by placing small classy badges on your Facebook or other websites, by answering scientific, environmental, cultural and other trivia questions, or by signing up for a newsletter which features ideas, other sites, and action steps to help the environment or other causes.

The points can then be donated, on this advertiser-supported site, to causes such as world hunger, education, tree planting, etc - and the site clearly explains which groups will benefit, and by how much, and for what purposes, each time a user donates points. Books for Africa is one of the groups supported by Everywun.com and the designated education-related charity - every time you click to give a book to a child, advertisers give cash to help Books for Africa ship more books and computers!

The site is a project of a software guru colleague of mine, Dan, who actually still personally reads and produces the newsletter entries as they come out three times a week.

You may sign up for Everywun with this link: http://www.everywun.com/signup?i=1551891

I will receive credit redeemable for good causes if you mention my name and email (Cristina Deptula/cedeptula@sbcglobal.net) when you join.
 
 
Everyone, Resolve Uganda will host another Lobby Day for peace in Uganda, and for world governments to do more to lobby for a political solution and a ceasefire and UN peacekeeper support, this June 22-23rd.

We encourage people to either visit their leaders' offices or to call/write/email as an alternative if a visit is not possible. Please request your government to provide logistical support for the Ugandan peace process and to stop child kidnappings and enslavement and violence against civilians.

You may find more information here: http://www.resolveuganda.org/node/829

By the way, there's a wonderful organization known as Bead for Life, where Ugandan people create traditional jewelry from recycled paper and sell the bracelets and necklaces. Profits go towards the beadmakers' income along with community development, health and education projects. You can buy jewelry from the site or host a 'Bead Party' where you and your friends can sample and buy jewelry together.

http://www.beadforlife.org/
 
 
Everyone, there actually is a GuluWalk in San Francisco, easily accessible from BART, right at the Powell St. Station. Goes through Columbus Street, location of City Lights Bookstore.

Yesterday there was a screening in Berkeley of War/Dance on the university campus - the woman organizing it listed her email, contact her if you're interested in helping out with the Gulu Walk or would like to know of any further events. I'm not able to attend this year due to an unavoidable schedule conflict with another charity event - but will email and offer to help out with any post-Walk events.

http://www.guluwalk.com/sanfrancisco/
 
 
I so wish I had seen this sooner, but the aspiring artists' auction site Sweet Charity, which normally organizes auctions to benefit RAINN and sexual assault survivors, took on Invisible Children for their fall charity.

Unfortunately the auction ended on October 4th, but I'd still encourage people here to write and thank them for choosing Invisible Children (http://www.sweet-charity.net) and/or to create a profile on the site and sign up as a pinch hitter (someone who creates art or writes stories in the event that someone wins an auction item and the person forgets to or somehow can't send the artistic product.) There's a whole list of people looking for pinch hitters to provide a variety of items.

These online events can raise tens of thousands of dollars and it's wonderful that the funding's going to rebuilding Uganda!
 
 
 
I received this message from Gulu Walk's organizers recently informing us that no one as of yet has stepped up to organize and promote a Gulu Walk event for San Francisco. I would love to see someone do this and will certainly assist that person with publicity and flyering before and during the event.

Would organize myself but my mother is a breast cancer survivor and she and I normally attend the Cancer Society's walkathon with her company's team in the morning, then make our way over to the Gulu Walk afterwards if it's the same day. And someone should be there during the entire Gulu Walk event.

Gulu Walk will provide info and resources and flyers to hand out - apparently it's just a matter of reserving a space and then advertising online, posting flyers, reaching out to schools and colleges and service clubs.

Most of the Gulu Walk's fundraising happens online before the event and people raise more than they think when they email friends and family. Also good idea to have a donation jar there at the event for people to drop cash into even if they don't have time to walk.

I can also provide contact info for the person who organized the event last year in San Francisco if someone would like.

Hello GuluWalkers!

First off, I want to thank you for all your support and efforts last year in the San Francisco GuluWalk! If not for you, we couldn't have had such a successful event worldwide!

Secondly, I would like to ask for some assistance. Unfortunately the organizer from last year is unable to run the GuluWalk in San Francisco this year. However, we would love to see it continue as the walk has been talking place in your area since the beginning of GuluWalk in 2005! If you, or if you know of someone that would be interested in organizing the GuluWalk in San Francisco, please contact me. There's still 2 months left, so plenty of time for organizing. I'm also here to help with anything and everything, so please do not hesitate to contact me.

Thanks again for your support!

Kind regards,

~Andrea

--
Andrea McKinlay
Events & Operations Coordinator
Athletes for Africa & GuluWalk
Tel: 416.686.1533
215 Spadina Ave, Suite 500
Toronto, ON. Canada
M5T 2C7
www.guluwalk.com
 
 
Hi everyone, passing on the word about a great organization with which some of my friends are involved, Kiva Microcredit. You may read about Kiva online at http://www.kiva.org/about - they lend money to entrepreneurs in developing countries, including Uganda, through international partners, and have an excellent record of loans being paid back on time and satisfied customers.

People may go on the site and select a specific entrepreneur or group of entrepreneurs and donate a small amount ($25 suggested, I believe) through PayPal or a credit card and it will be combined with other donations until the total amount the person needs (usually a few hundred dollars) is raised. Donors build a relationship with the business owners receiving the loans via email and letters sent through local organizations and usually receive their money back within a year. Kiva is a well-established organization, receiving corporate donations from Google and Microsoft and other major firms. They have a whole section on loan risk management and due diligence and a very professional finance team.

I looked through the list of projects available for sponsorship and noticed that some of the oldest listed projects, which have not yet reached their funding goal within a month but will still expire from the site, are located in Uganda. Would encourage anyone to consider assisting these entrepreneurs and helping build a more stable society there.
 
 
28 July 2008 @ 11:04 pm
 I want to work in an orpanage next summer. I am not exactly where. I heard of Invisible Children for the first time today. If you have contacts in Uganda, that'd would be awesome! I would love to even talk to a person that has been there and can share about a little that has to do with the ministries there. 

In Christ, 
Sheila
 
 
Is there anyone here in the United States, near California, who's leaving soon for a trip to Uganda and would be able to drop off book donations? I've just cleaned out some of my bookshelves and have a collection of slightly used but good condition novels and gift books which I'd be happy to send over.

I would be happy to just ship them to Uganda through one of the groups I mentioned in my last post - however, many are closer to adult fiction than strictly primary school books (although I do have some primary school type books) and as I'm trying to save on shipping :) I've got Anne of Green Gables, Sense and Sensibility, some friendship gift books, women's fiction novels I've picked up at writers' conferences, etc.
 
 
23 July 2008 @ 03:30 pm
In my last post to this community I asked about where to donate books for libraries and schools in Uganda, and I received some great suggestions in a comment from someone whom I believe actually lives in Uganda.

This would be a great project for a school or community group, maybe for recent college or high school graduates who have lots of books which they've already read. (I know I have a whole stack of novels, as I was a literature major!) I'll link to these groups through the webzine I help facilitate, Synchronized Chaos (chaos_zine) and would be glad to help head up a book drive.

Books Open the World, http://www.booksopentheworld.org/contact.php is an international literacy/education nonprofit providing books for Ugandan libraries and elementary schools, for children and adults. Their U.S. headquarters are in New Hampshire but they have accepted gently used book donations from all over, including from my alma mater, UC Davis. They also request small donations - $10 can make a difference.

Books for Kids in Slums, http://kabiza.com/booksforkidsinslums.htm supplies books to Ugandan primary (K-7) schools and says that literally thousands of children might enjoy each book sent over. They have a Ugandan address to send the books and say that flat rate international shipping from a US post office should be only about $11.

Libraries of Love, http://www.librariesoflove.org/index.php?option=com_content&task=blogsection&id=7&Itemid=40 headquartered in Texas, accepts elementary school children's book donations at a school in Austin and also from people around the world. May be possible to ship donated books domestically to Texas rather than all the way to Uganda, I can look into it if people are interested.